Eldar Shafir and Sendhil Mullainathan Teach You Why Having Too Little Means So Much

What can cause your IQ to drop the equivalent of 13 points?

Losing a night’s sleep. Or experiencing financial scarcity.

The effects of scarcity are wide-reaching and affect us in a deep neurological way. This book is about scarcity in all its forms — financial, social, time, and more. 

What can you do to combat scarcity?

Scarcity mindset experts Eldar Shafir and Sendhil Mullainathan are here to teach you a lot about having too little. 

In their book, Scarcity: Why Having Too Little Means So Much, they’ll introduce you to the science behind the scarcity mindset and help you make plans to avoid several common scarcity traps.

By doing the book in Pique, you’ll get to experience Scarcity with hands-on activities co-created directly with Eldar Shafir and Sendhil Mullainathan. You’ll get a trial run of all of the practices introduced. And, after trying them out, there will be a clearer path to keep using them going forward.

What can you expect?

Instead of just reading about scarcity traps, in Pique, you’ll get to actively plan for them. 

One way you’ll do that? Making a plan to avoid the abundance trap. 

It might sound counterintuitive, but scarcity begins with abundance. It doesn’t matter whether we’re talking about time, savings, or toothpaste. When you have a lot of something, it’s easy to use it frivolously. 

In fact, the reason it’s easy to be frivolous is that our brains are wired to have a neurological reaction to the abundance. That feeling when it’s payday and a check hits your bank account? That is the consequence of abundance. 

Abundance makes your brain feel safe in its resources and makes you less likely to stick to long-term plans — hence the tendency of people to eat out or shop the weekend after payday despite trying to save money.

In Pique, you’ll reflect on an abundance you may experience soon and make a plan on how you’ll manage that abundance to avoid a scarcity trap.

Ready to dive into Scarcity?

The science of scarcity influences everything so it can feel overwhelming to find a place to start. Thankfully, Scarcity by Eldar Shafir and Sendhil Mullainathan makes it easier. Scarcity and many more great behavioral science books are available in the Pique app right now. 

Head into the app to get started!

A Joke Just Might Get You A Raise With Jennifer Aaker and Naomi Bagdonas

Most of us feel like we can’t bring our sense of humor to work. We have to wear boring clothes, make totally serious presentations, and approach everything with a demeanor so dry that it makes staring at a wall seem fun. 

We think to be professional we have to be serious.

Turns out, we’re wrong. 

Robert Half International and Hodge-Cronin & Associates found 98% of surveyed executive leaders preferred employees with a sense of humor. 84% believed employees with a sense of humor do better work. There’s a positive peer-to-peer effect too — humor can make our peers more likely to attribute higher status to us and to vote us into leadership roles.

Knowing that is all well and good… but how can we bring humor into the workplace in a way that feels comfortable and natural?

Workplace humor experts Jennifer Aaker and Naomi Bagdonas are here to help you invite humor to the morning meeting.

In their book, Humor, Seriously: Why Humor Is a Secret Weapon in Business and Life (And How Anyone Can Harness It. Even You.), they’ll walk you through the baby steps that can make a big difference in the way you’re perceived at work and on your own enjoyment. 

By doing the book in Pique, you’ll get to experience Humor, Seriously with hands-on activities co-created directly with Jennifer Aaker and Naomi Bagdonas. You’ll get a trial run of all of the practices introduced. And, after trying them out, there will be a clearer path to keep using them going forward.

What can you expect?

Instead of just reading about the positive effects of humor in the workplace, in Pique, you’ll get to experience them. 

One way you’ll do that? Using humor to solve problems you might otherwise have been unable to solve.

Whether it’s tackling a pesky QA issue, approaching the marketing presentation from a clearer angle, or fixing the coffee machine, everyday we creatively problem-solve at work. And science shows that humor just might increase our capacity to do so.

In an experiment by Alice Isen, participants had to mount a candle to a wall… with no mount. To see how humor affects problem solving, Isen and her colleagues had half of participants watch a neutral video before taking on the challenge, while the other half watched a humorous one. More than twice as many people who watched the funny video solved the puzzle. Laughter didn’t make the second group smarter; but it did help them overcome their functional fixedness and see new connections and associations.

In Pique, you’ll try out your own version of the experiment by watching funny videos and doing a small creative problem-solving task. Then, we’ll help you reflect on how you can bring that forward and hold time for humor in your workplace problem-solving spaces.

Ready to get serious about humor with Humor, Seriously?

Bringing laughter into the workplace can be intimidating. Humor, Seriously by Jennifer Aaker and Naomi Bagdonas can make it far easier. It and many more great behavioral science books are available in the Pique app right now. 

Hop into Pique to get started today!

Elizabeth Dunn and Mike Norton Teach You How To Make A Dollar Smile

When you think about spending money on things that will make you happy, do you think of TVs and cars and giant homes? If you’re like most people then you do. And if you’re like most people then you’re wrong.

We’re notoriously bad at knowing what will make us happy.

But, if we’re so bad at knowing, how can we change that?

Get ready to turn those Franklin frowns upside down, because Happy Money experts Elizabeth Dunn and Mike Norton are here to teach you all they know.

In their book, Happy Money: The New Science of Smarter Spending, they’ll take you to the knowledge bank. They’ll do some myth-busting on what purchases matter most to and teach you several different ways to milk the happiness from your budget.

By doing the book in Pique, you’ll get to experience Happy Money with hands-on activities co-created directly with Elizabeth Dunn and Mike Norton. You’ll get a trial run of all of the practices introduced. And, after trying them out, there will be a clearer path to keep using them going forward.

What can you expect?

Instead of just reading about how you can prioritize happiness with your purchases, in Pique, you’ll get to experience it. 

One way you’ll do that? Buying meaningful time with family and friends.

Elizabeth Dunn and Mike Norton will help you think about how money just might be able to buy happiness. 

Think about how much money you’ve spent on socializing, from birthday parties, to road trips, to date nights. Even going out for after-work drinks with co-workers is more expensive than going home.

The same is true with family. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, raising a child now costs as much as $13,830 a year for middle-income families. And in a 2003 poll, over 80 percent of Americans — with and without children — reported wishing they had more time to spend with their families.

People are at their happiest when spending time with family and friends. But, doing so is expensive, which is why Elizabeth and Mike will help you prioritize and plan for time with those you love most.

Want to make the most of Happy Money?

Talking about money isn’t easy. Thankfully, Happy Money by Elizabeth Dunn and Mike Norton can make it more fun. They’ll walk you through how to prioritize spending your extra cash so you can cash out on happiness. It and many more great behavioral science books are available in the Pique app right now. 

Head into the app to get started!

Wendy Wood Can Help You Put Down Your Phone

Wake up. Check phone.

Finish sending email. Check phone. 

Scale Mount Everest, in a feat of superhuman endurance. Check phone. 

Somehow, you’re always reaching for your phone… even when you’re already on it scrolling mindlessly.

That’s because it’s a habit. And habits are incredibly powerful. But, most of us aren’t using the power of habits to our advantage. And doing so can have huge benefits. 

But, if they’re automatic, how can you take a more active role in your habits?

Get ready to take more control of your automaticity because habits expert Wendy Wood is here to help.

In her book, Good Habits, Bad Habits: The Science of Making Positive Changes That Stick, Wendy will loop you in on all things less. She does some myth-busting on habits (the “21 days to form a habit” is a big, ol’ rumor) and teaches you several different ways to take the reins on your habit brain. 

By doing the book in Pique, you’ll get to experience the power of habits with hands-on activities co-created directly with Wendy Wood. You’ll get a trial run with each of the tools introduced and see first-hand which would work best in your life. And, after trying them out, there will be a clearer path to keep using them going forward.

What can you expect?

Instead of just reading about habits, in Pique, you’ll get to experience them. 

One way you’ll do that? You’ll form better technology habits.

You’re likely someone who checks your work email after the conventional workday is done. We can say this because in the latest Gallup data 59 percent of U.S. workers who had work email accounts did so. This isn’t limited to emails though. Americans check their phones 8 billion times a day, which means an average of 46 times per person. 

On top of that, five out of ten U.S. drivers in a survey reported reading phone messages behind the wheel, and a third reported writing messages. And… it gets worse. In a survey of medical technicians, about half admitted to talking on a cell phone during heart surgery when they were supposed to be monitoring bypass machines. 

We do it because it’s a habit — and we develop habits because they help us save time and mental energy. But shaking up your context forces you out of habits. During a UK public transit worker strike, many riders had to reroute their commutes. Afterwards, five percent never returned to their old route. Why? The strike forced them to find better commutes, which they never would’ve done if they kept mindlessly commuting as usual. 

We can bring disruption upon ourselves by altering the contexts surrounding our technology. In Pique, you’ll get in the way of your tech habits, so you don’t become a part of any of the terrible statistics above.

Ready to dive into the power of habits and fix tech habits?

Setting habits is a difficult beast. Thankfully, Good Habits, Bad Habits by Wendy Wood is the companion you need to make it just a bit easier. She’ll walk you through everything you need to know and help you practice when it might be difficult to otherwise start. It and many more great behavioral science books are available in the Pique app right now. 

So make it a habit to use Pique today!

Illustration of Wendy Wood
Researcher Wendy Wood

Annie Duke Will Help You Order Off The Cheesecake Factory Menu

The options are seemingly endless. It’s almost disorienting considering the life you could lead if you made any individual choice.  

This is true of The Cheesecake Factory menu, but also when choosing between two different job offers, houses, and marketing plans for your business. 

Most of us “go with our gut” for decisions like these. And that’s fine for dessert, but it’s disastrous when deciding on bigger things like jobs, cities, and stock options. Is there another option, though?

Turns out, you can put the intuition back on the shelf because there are tons of decision-making skills that can make you a better decision-maker right now.

But how can you strengthen your decision-making skills?

Close the menu because decision expert and professional poker player Annie Duke is here to teach you how to decide.

In her book, How to Decide: Simple Tools for Making Better Choices, Annie will help you… well… decide. She does some decision-making myth-busting and teaches you several different ways to strengthen your decision-making muscles in your everyday life. 

By doing the book in Pique, you’ll get direct access to hands-on decision-making activities co-created directly with Annie Duke. You’ll get a trial run with each of the tools introduced and see first-hand which would work best in your life. And, after trying them out, there will be a clearer path to keep using them going forward. 

What can you expect?

Instead of just reading about decision-making tools, in Pique, you’ll get to experience them. 

One way you’ll do that? You’ll learn the difference between sorting and picking — and you might even utilize those new skills to order off the Cheesecake Factory menu.

While they might sound like synonyms, Annie Duke feels there is an important distinction between sorting and picking.  She believes the sorting process exists to narrow down to a set of “good enough” options. Recruiters do this as they sort through candidates to find options that are good enough to end up in an interview. Once you’ve sorted into “good enough”, then you have to pick between the “good enough” options.

The amount of time that someone who has food allergies should spend on a menu is higher than someone who doesn’t have food allergies. That’s because the outcome is more important when the consequences are higher. Similarly, businesses need to spend more time looking for a potential CEO than a potential intern.

The Only-Option Test clears away the debris cluttering your decision. If you’d be happy if the Caramel Apple Cheesecake was your only option and you’d be happy if Oreo Dream Extreme Cheesecake was your only option, you can flip a coin since you’ll be happy whichever way the coin lands.

Made the decision to experience How To Decide in Pique?

Decision-making is difficult, but it’s far easier with Annie Duke on your team. She’ll walk you through everything you need to know and help you practice when it might be difficult to otherwise start. It and many more great behavioral science books are available in the Pique app right now. 

So hop on in and get started!

Illustration of Annie Duke
Author Annie Duke

Leidy Klotz Can Fix Your Closet

When we have issues, most of us immediately think of adding things. Terrible closet layout? Add some dressers. Get some free-standing racks. Install random doodads to the door to hang things on.

Another option? Subtracting some clothes.

Turns out, subtracting is the problem-solving solution that most of us miss. And it can have huge benefits. 

But how can you stop yourself from overlooking subtraction?

Open the closet doors and get ready to make some room because subtraction expert Leidy Klotz is here to teach you all he knows.

In his book, Subtract: The Untapped Science of Less, Leidy will loop you in on all things less. He does some myth-busting on subtraction and teaches you several different ways to practice subtraction in your everyday life. 

By doing the book in Pique, you’ll get to experience the power of less with hands-on activities co-created directly with Leidy Klotz. You’ll get a trial run with each of the tools introduced and see first-hand which would work best in your life. And, after trying them out, there will be a clearer path to keep using them going forward.

What can you expect?

Instead of just reading about the importance of subtraction, in Pique, you’ll get to experience it. 

One way you’ll do that? You’ll put a magnifying glass on the invisible barriers in your environment that influence your behavior and subtract them to create change.

Though you fully intended to go home and make dinner, you continue to find yourself caving into stopping at the drive-thru on our way home from work. The motivation already exists — you don’t want to be stopping at the drive-thru — but time after time, you find yourself there. Why is that?

Kurt Lewin was a prominent psychologist with a lot of theories that intersect with the idea of subtraction. One of these is his “field theory.” Essentially, behavior is a product of people and their surroundings — or their field. 

We can change our behavior by relieving some of the tension our environments create. Lewin found that changing the invisible forces was often the best way to change our behavior. One way to do that? Subtract from them. Specifically, subtract the things in the environment that are creating tension and making it impossible to achieve your goals. Take a different route home to avoid the siren song of the drive-thru.

Ready to dive into the power of subtraction and fix your closet?

Subtraction is something that doesn’t come easily to us. Thankfully, Subtract by Leidy Klotz makes it far easier. He’ll walk you through everything you need to know and help you practice when it might be difficult to otherwise start. It and many more great behavioral science books are available in the Pique app right now. 

So hop on in and get started!

Illustration Leidy Klotz
Researcher Leidy Klotz

Dolly Chugh Wants You To Be A Good-ish Person

Most of us want to be good people. But, we aren’t always good people — because no one is. And when someone threatens our identity as a good person by calling out the moments where we could improve, it often sends us into Defense Mode. As a result of our instinct to defend that “good person identity,” we often make it harder for ourselves to become better people.

Behavioral scientist Dolly Chugh believes that one way to make sure that doesn’t happen is to give up on being a good person… and instead prioritize being a good-ish person. 

Good-ish people know that they are works-in-progress. So, when they hear they need to do better in an area, it’s easier for them to do so because they already knew they had room to grow.

But how can you give up on good and aim for good-ish?

In her book, The Person You Mean to Be: How Good People Fight Bias, Dolly will help you prioritize good-ish. She’ll teach you how to have uncomfortable conversations and how to examine your own areas for growth. 

By doing the book in Pique, you’ll get to experience the power of less with hands-on activities co-created directly with Dolly Chugh. You’ll get a trial run with each of the tools introduced and see first-hand which would work best in your life. And, after trying them out, there will be a clearer path to keep using them going forward.

What can you expect?

Instead of just reading about being good-ish, in Pique, you’ll examine your own life and areas where you could aim for good-ish. 

One way you’ll do that? You’ll learn about your own bounded awareness.

Essentially, we see what we expect to see. Researcher Jeremy Wolfe and his colleagues created an airport security screening process. When participants were told that a dangerous object would appear 50% of the time, they had a 7% error rate. But, when they were told that the dangerous object would appear 1% of the time, they had a 30% error rate. They didn’t expect to see something, so they didn’t see it, even when it was right there. 

Dolly and Harvard Business School Professor Max Bazerman call this tendency to not see, seek, or use readily available and relevant information “bounded awareness.” We replicate our own bounded awareness in our circles. A PRRI (Public Religion Research Institute) American Values Survey found that most of us — regardless of race or ethnicity — build echo chambers in our closest relationships, but whites in America have the loudest echo chamber. On top of that, research by psychologist Drew Jacoby-Senghor found that we don’t just create demographic echo chambers, we also tend to create bias echo chambers.

With help from Dolly in Pique, you’ll examine your own echo chambers and where you can look to grow.

Ready to focus on growing into good-ish?

Fighting your own bias and committing to your own growth is work. Thankfully, with The Person You Mean To Be by Dolly Chugh, you’ll have a fantastic educator and resource at your side. She’ll walk you through everything you need to know and help you practice when it might be difficult to otherwise start. It and many more great behavioral science books are available in the Pique app right now. 

Head to Pique to get started!

Illustration of Dolly Chugh
Researcher Dolly Chugh

Learning By Doing

You want to start working out more and you know the first place you’ll go… The library! There you’ll be able to read tons of books on bicep curls and hiking and you’ll be in shape in no time.

Wait, something’s not right. 

Just because you read a book on bicep curls doesn’t mean you can do a bicep curl. That’s because reading doesn’t make you any better at doing things. 

That’s why Pique helps you go beyond reading. We help you do the book.

Why is “doing the book” helpful? 

Pique is like if you could directly ask the author, “what do I need to know?” We’ve worked with authors to develop experiences that show you how takeaways from the book apply directly to your life. 

Pique lets you live the book’s takeaways in your life. With Pique, you’ll break out of your routines with hands-on activities co-created with authors that help you feel the concepts in an active way.

Rather than learning about how subtraction is overlooked, you’ll do activities created by Leidy Klotz to show you how you’re actively overlooking subtraction right now. Instead of reading about the best way to make a change, you’ll make a plan to utilize fresh starts with Katy Milkman. You’ll go beyond reading about uncomfortable conversations and you’ll prepare to have them with Dolly Chugh.

With experience, key points go beyond being words on a page. Pique will help you apply them to your everyday life. And, after trying it out, there will be a clearer path to keep making those beneficial changes going forward.

How long does it take?

Reading a full nonfiction book can take 3 hours. And it can take much longer when you’re really trying to internalize all of the great points the author is making. Pique will help you see the key takeaways in your life in just 5 minutes per experience.

What kind of books can you expect?

Nonfiction is chock full of insights on how to grow, change, and become a better version of yourself. But, those insights don’t mean anything if you don’t actually see them play out in your own life.

That’s why we’ve curated a library of nonfiction that we could all learn from. If you haven’t already read the books, our experiences will spark your curiosity in learning. And if you have already read them, Pique gives you the opportunity to take that knowledge one step further.

We’ll help you find your next must-read and we’ll make it into a must-do.